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Issuing country: Vatican City State

Date of issue: March 2017

Description of the designs The designs feature the coat of arms of the Sovereign of the Vatican City State, Pope Francis. The mintmark ‘R’ appears at the botoom left and the year of issuance ‘2017’ at the bottom right. The coins’ outer ring depicts the 12 stars of the European flag. The edge-lettering of the 2-euro coin is: 2 *, repeated six times, alternately upright and inverted.

Cool, end of a small part of the personality cult.

Wow, 5th design! One of the de facto cities, not even part of EU, has already 5th design :) I don't understand though how were they allowed to do that now because they (like everybody else) can change the current one only when the head of the state changes (did that happen recently?) or when 15 years have passed.

Indeed. In fact, when the Vatican released their Vacant See series after the death of Pope John Paul II, the ECB was not amused at all. They promptly changed the regulations so that those countries with their head of state on the coins, could from then on only depict their head for state on the coins, no temporary placeholders, and only change the design for a change of head state or of course after 15 years without a change of design (something which applies to Luxembourg now). Inexplicable that this design chase went through.

probably because the head of state (the Pope) had deauthorised his depiction on coins

I see no other valid reason than that!

So the Pope won, although in an interesting way. I just hope this wasn't for money (pun intended). Those working for Vatican coins and policies should be hired by Estonian, Irish or Austrian governments :)

This means that, save for the €0,50 ones, the Pope Francis coins are actually rarer than the Pope John Paul II ones.

The new Vatican euro coins are appearing:

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